BioTech FYI Center - Resources

Pathology

Pathology

  • WebPath: The Internet Pathology Laboratory - This electronic laboratory includes over 1700 images along with text and tutorials that demonstrate gross and microscopic pathologic findings associated with human disease states. There is a search engine available as well as ordering information for a Web-Path CD-ROM containing over 2300 images, over 2300 examination questions (including many extended matching questions), 27 case-based laboratory exercises, and 32 tutorials. The image quality is good and the text descriptions are complete and accurate. This is an excellent and technical educational resource.
  • PathWeb, Virtual Pathology Museum - In addition to complete notes for a number of U. of Connecticut pathology courses, this site offers a comprehensive searchable pictoral overview of organs in the human body and specific disease processes occurring in each organ. A new user interface allows one to search for information about particular conditions by organ and disease(s).

Infectious Disease Sites

  • The Bad Bug Book - This site is a online version of the FDA's guide on food poisoning. There are many links to various illnesses and syndromes caused by ingestion of plants, fungi, protozoans and fish. The intent in each chapter is to provide basic facts regarding these or ganisms and toxins, including their characteristics, habitat or source, associated foods, infective dose, characteristic disease symptoms, complications, recent and/or major outbreaks, and any susceptible populations. The chapters contain minimal information on the analytical methods used to detect, isolate, and/or identify the pathogens or natural toxins.
  • OUTBREAK - Dengue, ebola, malaria, small pox, and yellow fever are just a few of the diseases focused on at this site. Brief descriptions, facts, and answers to frequently asked questions about each diseease are covered. Current news items dealing with diseases and chemical and biological agents are discussed. Information on becoming a pathologist or a virologist is available at this site.
  • The Herpes Zone - This site explains the herpes virus life cycle and differentiates between the various diseases caused by forms of the herpes viruses; chickenpox, shingles, cold sores, and the STD commonly known as herpes. While all forms are discussed, the STD form is discussed in the most detail with information about the health risks associated with this virus, how to determine when it is dormant, preventing transmission, and managing the disease.
  • Atlas of Medical Parasitology - An excellent site; the information is organized by site of infection. The drawback to this site is that the scientific name for the parasite must be known. Within the description of the parasite are the taxonomic classification, site of infection, life cycle of the parasite, geographic distribution, and several images of the disease state. A few case reports are included. Contributions from the medical community are encouraged.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - This U.S. government page offers a very straightforward list of links in both text version and map version. It also provides a searchable index. Topics covered at this site include information about CDC, traveler's health, and CDC publications. It also offers a Health Information section which includes information on chronic diseases, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, cancer, diabetes, etc.
  • The UK Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Surveillance Unit Surveillance Unit - The Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Surveillance Unit is a must stop for anyone interested in spongiform encephalitis, or other "kuru"-like ailments. A glossary provides definitions of terms related to this fatal brain disease. An article on rapid analysis of tissue samples includes images of affected tissue. Information about pathology, variations, and reporting of these disorders is complemented by links to other sources of news and opinions on the subject.
  • HIV Insite - This comprehensive guide gives state-by-state information on community and research resources. It also includes epidemiologic and drug treatment databases, conference announcements, up-to-date treatment guidelines, and literature resources.
  • HIV Sequence Database - The HIV Sequence Database focuses on collecting HIV and related genetic sequence data (since 1987), providing a curatorial role in annotating this data, extensive computer analysis of HIV and related sequences, and publication of the data and analyses.
  • WHO Malaria Database - The World Health Organization has developed this malaria database. It includes an introduction, nucleotide and protein information, genome mapping data, a discussion group, and info on conferences or courses, research jobs, journals, and projects and research grants.
Pathology